Maps, Colors & More of the 2017 French Presidential Election – Critique of Data Story

With the anticipation of the results of the French presidential election in full swing, NY Times used maps and graphs to help readers understand the results thus far. How did they do? Well, let’s take a look.

In an article titled, “How the Election Split France”, readers get a brief description as to what the first round of voting results are with pictures of the candidates and their poll ratings provided, followed by two maps of France, each demonstrating the areas of support for the top two candidates: Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen. Using blue to represent Macron and red for Le Pen, the illustrator used lighter shades to represent less support and a darker shade for greater support. The maps provide enough information to show where each candidate received more support since it is obvious there was greater support based on the darker color of that specific area.

The article also includes a map of France where a color represents each of the candidates. However, this map can be interpreted incorrectly because the map shows a significantly greater amount of salmon (representing Le Pen) than baby blue (representing Macron), yet Macron received a greater percentage (24.0% compared to Le Pen’s 21.3%). Also, the map includes a color for Jean Lassalle and not Benoît Hamon, even though they mention Hamon in the article and not Lassalle.

The final component of the article focuses on how neither the Socialist or Republican party will win the election this year and then using a graph to show that between the 2012 and 2017 elections, there was an influx in support of “Other parties”.

Overall, the article did a decent job in displaying the results of the election. I thought the colors were helpful in the first graphic, but not as effective in the second graphic since the colors were misleading to the results and there was some confusion involving the candidates.

Yet, the reader can takeaway from the article that this election is close and a game changer.

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Christiana Mangiapane – Video Story

In a world full of stress and chaos, some find their outlet through dance and some of these people go by the name of Christiana Mangiapane.

Since she was two years old, Christiana has embraced this art, particularly through ballet, but enjoys tap as well. Not only is she a dancer, but her two younger sisters, Victoria and Arianna, are dancers as well, where they take after their mother, who danced her entire life.

Dancing serves as a stress reliever for Christiana, where no matter how hard she tries, she knows that she will eventually achieve her goals through dance because she is just that passionate about it.

For years to come, Christiana says that she will always keep dance as a part of her life, even encouraging her future children one day to follow the same path she did.

To see the interview and Christiana’s beautiful dancing, click below.

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